Mongrel Desexing Programme

Many dogs can be found wandering around construction sites and villages across Hong Kong, allowed to breed freely. The dogs are vulnerable to disease, accidents and malnourishment while their puppies are often abandoned.

Birth control is key to reducing the stray animal population, helping both the dogs and the communities in which they live. To this end, we launched the Mongrel Desexing Programme to provide free neutering services to stray dogs.

Mongrels can be spayed and neutered at our Welfare Desexing Clinic located in Fairview Park, Yuen Long. To be eligible, dogs must be:

  • Mongrels
  • Aged between four months and seven years
  • Healthy and a healthy weight

We also offer free-of-charge rabies vaccinations and dog licensing to encourage responsible dog ownership.

Booking is easy. Simply call 2593 5438 for our Yuen Long clinic or 2232 5513 for our Animal Welfare Vehicle.

Some terms and conditions do apply though:

  • A mongrel dog is defined as not a pedigree dog or not an obvious cross breed.
  • The determination of the dogs’ breed is at the discretion of SPCA veterinary surgeon.
  • If the dog fails to qualify for the programme, desexing is still possible but normal desexing fees will be applied.
  • Allocation of desexing slots will be done on a first come first served basis. There are limited slots available.
  • Due to limited slots, the owner/agent must request for a mongrel desex at the time of booking; it cannot be applied for on the desexing day or after surgery.
  • Failure to turn up or over applying for slots, may result in applicants/owners being barred from future use of the programme.
  • Dogs de-sexed under this scheme must be identifiable by microchip. If the dog is not already microchipped and licenced or will not be micro-chipped and licenced then an ISO microchip will be implanted purely for identification purposes. This is a compulsory requirement of the scheme.
  • The SPCA reserves the right to alter the terms and conditions of this scheme and its determination on the right to use the SPCA’s services is final.
  • The English version of these Terms and Conditions shall prevail wherever there is a discrepancy between the English and the Chinese versions.

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